The Healing Power of Getting Away

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It was a simple weekend away to celebrate our anniversary. But It became a weekend of incredible healing for my husband and I. We talked like we had not talked in a long, long time. We shared our hopes, we opened up about our fears, we laughed and we cried.

We heard each other in a way we haven’t done in many months, if not years.

Let me set the scene for you. It isn’t that different than many stories. We have adult children. Our 21-year-old is at college and comes home during his breaks. Our 24-year-old has graduated and is living at home, working at McDonalds while he waits for the permanent career job to come along.

If you have younger children, you might think with adult children doing their own thing a lot of the time we don’t need to get away in order to talk.

You’d be wrong. Marriage takes effort in all seasons of life!

For a myriad of reasons, many of us find it difficult to spend time in deeper communication with someone that our soul longs for. Whether it be looking at the same old walls every day, or the same old mess (try persuading a 24-year-old to clean up after himself, it’s as bad as a 4-year-old. Sigh.), or the stresses of work and family, just finding the time, or a host of other reasons, we start to slip away into our own little worlds. We have to keep inviting our spouse into our lives.

It can be the same in our relationship with God. You can pray with the kids in the room, in the middle of the mess, but–hands up–who finds the pouring-your-heart-out kind of prayers easy in the midst of distractions. Just like any other relationship, a getaway with God can bring deep healing to our relationship with Him and with ourselves.

What can you do if you cannot afford to take time away to retreat with God?

How do you get away with God if you don't have the time or space?Click To Tweet

Recently I was reminded of the story of Susanna Wesley, the mother of Charles and John. She had 19 children, nine of whom died in infancy, and there were all sorts of other problems at home. All of that left her with little time to focus on prayer. With ten children around, it was not just finding the time that was hard, it was finding the space, too.

Despite all of the demands on her time, she knew how important prayer was and she did not want to leave it out of her life. So she used her apron. She would sit down in the kitchen, flip her apron up over her head and pray. She taught her children not to bother her when she did that, and so she gave herself time and space to pray.

Susanna Wesley flipped her apron over her head to pray. How do you make space for prayer?Click To Tweet

Flipping an apron up over your head isn’t the solution for everyone, but think of her apron as representing something in your life. If you have the time and money, go away on a retreat. Many churches and monasteries offer options for silent retreats. Or maybe it’s a special chair in the house that is your praying chair or a special bench in the park. Maybe it’s the old church down the road that is always open, or maybe you have been able to create your own prayer closet in your home where you can sneak away in your down moments.

Don’t put off the deeper communication with God because the time and space don’t afford you opportunity. None of us can afford to put it off!

Share in the comments below or on Facebook, the different ways you connect with God. Let’s share our ideas and spark a renewal in our hearts. Or grab our Daily Scripture Writing Plan as a way to start a conversation with God.

Whether you flip an apron over your head, hide in the bathroom or go on a silent retreat, you should experience the healing power of getting away with God.

Zoe Gregg

Zoe Gregg

A creative woman at heart, Zoe works to introduce local school children to God through “Open the Book” and “Prayer Spaces”. She is passionate about storytelling, believing that each of us has our own unique story to tell as well as delighting in traditional tales.
Zoe Gregg

About Zoe Gregg

A creative woman at heart, Zoe works to introduce local school children to God through “Open the Book” and “Prayer Spaces”. She is passionate about storytelling, believing that each of us has our own unique story to tell as well as delighting in traditional tales.

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